Romanian history fans and particularly those interested in the personality of Prince Constantin Brancoveanu can now add a new spot on their list of sites to visit as the Potlogi court is now open to the public.

Built in 1689, it includes the Brancoveanu palace, the ruins of the old princely house, of the help house and those of a repair shop for carriages. The court is surrounded by a tall brick wall and its entrance is marked by an arched gate. The court is divided into three parts: one for the staff, one for the military and one exclusively for the princely family. The Sf. Dumitru church can also be seen on the right side of the entrance.

The estate is representative for the residential architecture of the end of the 17th century, and is designed in an elaborate style, featuring gardens and water areas.

The ensemble, which is now open following RON 40 million restoration works, has first underwent repairing in 1915. After Brancoveanu was killed in 1714, the palace was devastated. During communist time, its decay further advanced and the site even served as an animal farm.

Now, with a new outlook, the ensemble will be included in a national tourist circuit alongside the Mogosoaia palace and the Targoviste court.

How to get there:
The Potlogi commune can be found 45 km north of Bucharest, following the E81.